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Forum » Community » Competitions and Activities » Bar jokes!
Bar jokes!
LicoricePleaseDate: Sunday, 28 Jul 2013, 3:41 PM | Message # 1
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We have words for "bar" and "bartender" in our dictionary. You tell us your best bar joke, then list the words (or grammar) in the joke that we haven't added/created yet!

 
StrangerComeKnockingDate: Sunday, 28 Jul 2013, 5:07 PM | Message # 2
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I'm just going to throw in something here about bar jokes. Some tend to rely on double-meaning or irony for humor. For example:

"Three lengths of rope walk up to a bar and one says, 'I'm going to get a drink.' He goes in and the bartender says 'Sorry, we don't serve rope.' Second piece of rope walks in and the bartender says, 'Sorry, we don't serve rope.' Both pieces leave the bar. The third piece of rope ties himself into a knot and walks into the bar. Bartender says, 'I'm sorry, I can't serve you. You're a piece of rope.' And the piece of rope says, 'No, I'm knot.' "

See what I mean? How does one utilize this in Gallifreyan, where words are relatively fresh, having singular meaning, and (above all) phonetic? Well, here are a few suggestions:

ṱɐrzɛl - a fool-dance, dance without steps or rhythm (basically what you end up doing when someone throws you onto the floor and expects Dancing with the Stars)

tɐrzəl - the ceremonial headdress worn by those in the Gallifreyan government

Similar-sounding words can be played with. And don't forget time-travel. Parallels, out-of-orders, stuff like that.

And classic jokes are good, too. I mean, there really isn't a limit here. (But if it contains severe adult content, put it in a spoiler with a warning, thanks. Or start a new, exclusive thread.)

Just a few thoughts. Go nuts.



"Everybody knows that everybody dies." -River Song
 
StrangerComeKnockingDate: Sunday, 04 Aug 2013, 6:00 AM | Message # 3
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Two guys walk into a bar.

What a shame. You'd have thought one of them would have seen the bar.



"Everybody knows that everybody dies." -River Song
 
NorWinDate: Tuesday, 06 Aug 2013, 12:39 PM | Message # 4
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Bwahaha! So, something about walk into/bump/hit/move/enter? We have a word for "to walk" but "walk into" is a different thing. I suppose there could be a double-meaning between one of the synonyms of the 1st meaning and one of the synonyms of the 2nd? Sorry, my brain doesn't seem to work too well tonight.

(Ah, and I found this the other day:
A neutron walks into a bar. "I'd like a beer" he says. The bartender promptly serves up a beer. "How much will that be?" asks the neutron. "For you? No charge".)
 
StrangerComeKnockingDate: Wednesday, 07 Aug 2013, 7:57 AM | Message # 5
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Yay science! Opens up a whole world of science-y related words that we need.

I'm wondering if there isn't some way to rework some of the double-meaning (particularly in yours, NorWin). Maybe make "neutron" which is a particle with no charge, somehow related to "beer" in the sense that there's nothing going on in the mind of an inebriated individual.



"Everybody knows that everybody dies." -River Song
 
StrangerComeKnockingDate: Wednesday, 07 Aug 2013, 10:39 AM | Message # 6
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Something to consider:

Pandaks (made of brass), Pounds, and Guineas are used as currency. A guinea will buy you a few drinks in a bar.

gi.nɛj - guinea
pun - pound
pɑn.dɑk - pandak

To be used as a reference in the event money or currency comes up.




"Everybody knows that everybody dies." -River Song
 
StrangerComeKnockingDate: Tuesday, 20 Aug 2013, 7:12 PM | Message # 7
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George R. R. Martin, Joss Whedon, and Steven Moffat walk into a bar and everyone you've ever loved dies.

It's awful and perfect and oh-so-doable.

How do we want to do initials? I know in Russian they may be written but when spoken they use either the full name or just omit them.



"Everybody knows that everybody dies." -River Song
 
NorWinDate: Wednesday, 21 Aug 2013, 5:59 PM | Message # 8
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I suppose, if we consider that TARDIS is an acronym, that we'd either pronounce initials as individual letters, or group them in acronyms if it's pronounceable?
 
StrangerComeKnockingDate: Wednesday, 21 Aug 2013, 7:28 PM | Message # 9
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Early in the project, it was decided that TARDIS would remain Tardis, just for the sake of feels. (as related to me by Rhiannon)


"Everybody knows that everybody dies." -River Song
 
ActualimeerDate: Wednesday, 21 Aug 2013, 9:14 PM | Message # 10
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I would ask the following: would Time Lords use any kind of short hand?

I think of personal letters where a single letter was used the represent a name.

Added (21 Aug 2013, 9:14 PM)
---------------------------------------------
We know they use pseudonym s and nick names, maybe that's the approach.

 
StrangerComeKnockingDate: Thursday, 22 Aug 2013, 1:56 PM | Message # 11
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Let's keep it on topic, guys. It was a legitimate question, but further pursuit of the matter will have to be taken elsewhere. Thanks.

-StrangerComeKnocking



"Everybody knows that everybody dies." -River Song
 
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